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Ejisu Senior High Technical School Ejisu Senior High Technical School

Ejisu Senior High Technical School, We offer all courses like General Arts, Science,Business and Visual Arts.

We are located at Ejisu off Yaa Asantewaa Musuem road.

Ejisu M/A Model School Ejisu M/A Model School

Ejisu M/A Model school, Pacesetters in Excellence

We are located at Ejisu-Abankro road

P.O.BOX30 Ejisu-Kumasi

Spiritan University College Spiritan University College

Spiritan University College prepares you for your future

We are located at Ejisu, Abenkuro road.

Ejisuman Senior High School Ejisuman Senior High School

Ejisuman Senior High School

The seat of intelligence, equipping your ward with knowledge and skills as future leaders

Ejisuman is located at Ejisu, off Abankro road

P.O.BOX 46 KUMASI

Naasei Educational Complex Naasei Educational Complex

Naasei Educational Complex

Creche: Nursery: KG: JHS

We are located at Kwamo, highways

 

 

Simms SHS Closed Down Indefinitely Simms SHS Closed Down Indefinitely

Simms High School in Kumasi has been closed down indefinitely by the Kwabre East District Education Directorate.

The closure of the school is as a result of students rioting over food.

According to reports from the school, some second and third year students questioned what they say is preferential dining hall treatment given to their first-year juniors on government’s Free Senior High School programme.

The rampaging students damaged public and private property, including school furniture, electricity meters and cables as well as two staff cars.

According to school authorities, supper for second and third year students was suspended Thursday because some of them were engaged in extra-curricular activities.

The students were, however, furious about the development and caused a commotion, which took the police intervention to bring the situation under control.

On Friday morning, however, violence erupted again.

Meanwhile, the District Chief Executive for Kwabre East, Nana Osei Asibey Bonsu, says a committee will be established to investigate the issue.

End-of-term examinations have been suspended as authorities begin investigations into the matter.

Serwaa Nyarko SHS Students Protest Encroached School Lands Serwaa Nyarko SHS Students Protest Encroached School Lands

Students of Serwaa Nyarko Senior High School have protested against Kumasi Metropolitan Assembly and a private developer over encroachment of school’s land.

The students on Friday, December 15, 2017 hit the street of Kumasi to demand removal of containers on the school’s land.

According to the Authorities, the development poses a security threat to students and the students live in fear due to the activities of these encroachers.

All efforts by the school authorities to get rid of these encroachers have yielded no results.

Meanwhile, Authorities of the school have petitioned the Regional Minister, Mr. Simon Osei Mensah to intervene.

 

KNUST moves to promote clean energy use. KNUST moves to promote clean energy use.

Efforts at promoting clean energy use in the country has received a huge boost with the development of improved cook stoves by the Technology Consultancy Center (TCC) of the Kwame Nkrumah University of Science and Technology (KNUST). Read More

Free SHS: Headmaster of Prempeh College summoned for repeating first year students Free SHS: Headmaster of Prempeh College summoned for repeating first year students

The Headmaster of Prempeh College in Kumasi has been summoned to Accra, after he dismissed some continuing students for failing their promotional examination.

According to reports, about 50 first year students could not be promoted to the second year and they have to repeat year one.

But because they are not covered by the free SHS policy which is currently being enjoyed by all first year students, they have been asked to go home.

P.R.O of the Ghana Education Service Rev. Jonathan Bettey, told Radio Ghana that the Service and the Education Ministry have been informed of the development.

He said the Headmaster has been invited to Accra to find a solution to the problem.

On the challenges with the placement of first year students and difficulties in some schools due to inadequate facilities, Rev. Bettey said everything is being done to address them.

Education directors negligence lands GES in huge judgment debts Education directors negligence lands GES in huge judgment debts

The Ghana Education Service (GES) has warned it will no longer tolerate the conduct of officials whose actions cost the service huge sums of money in judgment debt.
Director-General, Jacob Kor, says negligence and unilateral action, especially, by some district directors against erring teachers have ended up in court.
Mr Kor will not name the officers but said they failed to follow due process in taking disciplinary decisions, sometimes, without involving national officers.
In one such instance, a decision by the District Director to unilaterally sack a teacher has cost the GES over Gh¢156,000 following a legal suit.
Addressing the 23rd Annual Conference of Directors of Education (CODE) in Kumasi, Mr Kor warned the service will not allow such acts to continue as the service is faced with several legal suits.
“There are so many court cases at the district levels and at the headquarters. Just at the headquarters, we have as many as seven court cases and sometimes when you want to use our managerial skills to stop them, they say contempt of court. I cannot do anything,” he said.
“Seven court cases; and where are they emanating from, right from the district. Just because some due processes are not being followed in order to sanction teachers. You have no power to sack a teacher,” a worried Mr Kor emphasized.
Angered by the action of one District Director who is now deceased, Mr Kor told the education directors conference he would have been forced to cough the judgment debt if the unnamed officer were to be alive.
“It is unfortunately that this District Director has passed on. If he were to be alive, he would have paid a judgment debt of over Gh¢156, 000 for sacking a teacher. Because of this omission of a District Director not following due processes, GES will have to vomit Gh¢156,000.00. We will not also allow this to continue,” he said.
Meanwhile, Mr. Kor has cited school heads for blame for the perennial problem of examination malpractices which he says remains an embarrassment to the Service.
He says some officials including directors have received queries for flouting the rules.
“Management, I urge you all to make a special effort to refrain from such acts. Several letters on this issue have been written so now queries have come to such heads and directors who disobey directives,” he said.

Revert SHS to 4 years – PTA demands Revert SHS to 4 years – PTA demands

The National Council of Parent-Teacher Association has backed calls for the duration of the senior high school (SHS) education to be reversed to four years.
The council argues that students effectively study for two years two months in the current 3-year SHS system and write the West Africa Secondary Schools Certificate Examination (WASSCE).
President of the association, Mr Alexander Yaw Danso disclosed this to The Finder in an interview.
In view of the divided opinion on this hot issue, he suggested a forum for stakeholders to discuss the way forward for senior high school education in Ghana.
Challenges in SHS education
He identified the lack of monitoring, inadequate textbooks, poor commitment of some teachers to the profession and the short time for senior high school education as the key challenges.
Mr Danso described the 2016 WASSCE results as abysmal and explained that the council has monitored the results of WASSCE for years and noticed that the standard of education in the country is falling.
Over 1 million flop at WASSCE in 6 yrs
From 2011 to date, the pass rate for core subjects are 2011 – 38.1745%,2012 – 42.1666%, 2013 – 29.1305%, 2014 – 28.4687%, 2015 – 16.8364% and 2016-24.7197%.
Over one million (1,081,020) out of the over 1.5 million (1,510, 624) candidates who sat for the West Africa Senior Schools Certificate Examination (WASSCE) between 2011 and 2016 failed to secure grades A1 to C6 in the three core subjects required for admission into tertiary institutions.
The cut-off point for admission into universities in the country is A1 — C6.
Data from the West African Examination Council (WAEC) analysed by The Finder revealed that only 429,604 out of the over 1.5 million (1,510, 624) candidates who sat for WASSCE within the six-year period (2011 to 2016) obtained grades A1 to C6 in the key core subjects.
The 429,604 candidates whose­cured A1 to C6 within the six-year period constitute 28.44%, while the over one million (1,081,020) who obtained grades D7 – F9, considered as not good enough for admission into tertiary institutions, constitute 71.56%.
These were contained in a document titled ‘Performance statics at Grade A1 to C6 in six subjects including Maths, English and Integrated Sci­ence or Social Studies (WASSCE 2011 to 2016)’.
Within the period, the data revealed that over 1.5 million (1,518,248) candidates registered for WASSCE but 7,621 were absent.
Therefore, the total number of candidates who took the examination was 1.5 million (1,510, 624).
Inadequate textbooks
Mr Danso stated that senior high schools (SHS) do not have adequate textbooks, saying when school re-opens SHS students would not have textbooks.
According to him, the last time the Ghana Education Service supplied textbooks to schools was some four years ago.
He urged government to fulfil its part of the obligation by providing textbooks for students to perform well in the examination.
Poor supervision
He identified poor monitoring of tutors as one of the major challenges resulting in the poor performance of candidates.
He called on the Ghana Education Service (GES) to adhere to its duty of ensuring effective supervision of teachers to make them cover the number of hours required for teaching.
He observed that GES has drifted focus from its core mandate of ensuring quality education for Ghanaians.
Poor commitment of tutors
Mr Danso stated that some teachers are not committed to their profession and rather concentrate on extra classes after school to make additional income.
According to him, a lot of the teachers concentrate on producing pamphlets, some of which are below the standard, as a means of making additional income.

The west African Examination Council The west African Examination Council

The west African Examination Council

P.O.BOX KS 5313 KUMASI

Contact: 03220-26064

03220-34448

03220-34451

Amakom.

KNUST gets two new petrochemical laboratories KNUST gets two new petrochemical laboratories

 

The Ministry of Petroleum has commissioned two new laboratories for the Chemical and Petro-Chemical Departments of the Kwame Nkrumah University of Science and Technology (KNUST) at a ceremony in Kumasi over the weekend.

The facilities, which involved the redesigning and layout, refurbishment works and installation of specialised equipment for the existing Process Engineering and Unit Operations laboratories was constructed at a cost of $2.8 million.

The project is a component of the Oil and Gas Capacity Building Project aimed to support and strengthen the capacity of KNUST to be able to provide high-level degree programmes in petroleum and petrochemical engineering programmes.

The facilities have also been equipped with teaching materials such as measuring, unit operation equipment for petroleum and petrochemical engineering courses.

The Minister of Petroleum, Mr Armah Kofi Buah in a speech read on his behalf at the commissioning indicated that the implementation of the oil and gas capacity building project has helped mitigate some of the obstacles in the oil and gas sector.

According to him, the project has as well enhanced transparency by way of strengthening local technical skills in the oil and gas sector. “The project has also improved policy formulation and regulatory capacity of key public institutions in the sector”, Mr Buah said.

The Minister indicated that the passage of the Local Content and Local Participation Regulation (L.I 2204) of 2013 had ensured that indigenous Ghanaians participate fully in the value chain.

“It is therefore important to ensure that students of the two departments as well as persons seeking to be players in the sector are given the requisite skills and knowledge to be able to make a difference”, Mr Buah intimated.

The Minister added that government’s quest to ensure the availability of expertise and skills had seen the introduction of some innovative measures to create employment opportunities in for young people.

He emphasised that the Ministry in collaboration with the Petroleum Commission (PC) has introduced a two year career skills development initiative under the Ghana Upstream Sector Internship Programme (GUSIP).

The GUSIP programme which entails a comprehensive practical skills development aimed to expose young people to the oil and gas working environment would ensure they have practical experience, vocational skills and professional integration into industry.

The Minister, thus challenged young graduates wishing to work in the sector to embrace the initiative as a career development pathway.

The Minister, congratulating the management of KNUST for effectively driving the project to completion, encouraged both students and Lecturers of the school to ensure the highest level of maintenance culture.

That he stressed would ensure the maximum benefits of the investments made in the two facilities would be derived.

The Vice Chancellor of the KNUST, Professor William Otto Ellis commended the Ministry for completion of the project and assured the two facilities would be put to good use.

‘The head is for thinking’ – GES hits back at Prof Quarm ‘The head is for thinking’ – GES hits back at Prof Quarm

The heavily-criticised primary one natural science textbook, which claims the human head is used for carrying load, is not approved, the Ministry of Education has announced.

A statement issued Monday afternoon read: ” It must be noted that the book in question is not an approved textbook for schools under the Ghana Education Service,” and advised heads of schools and parents against patronising the said book authored by Prof. Joseph Albert Quarm.

The book, Natural Science for Primary Schools – Pupil’s Book 1, with an illustration, states the function of the human head is for carrying load; something that has since sparked public condemnation among some academic scholars.

Although some people including the Vice President of think-tank group, Imani Ghana, Kofi Bentil, have called for the withdrawal of the said textbook, Prof. Quarm insists the classification of the head as part of the human body for carrying load is correct.

“It is absolutely correct because over here we are using activity-based learning where you need to consider teaching and learning materials and where you need to take the child to the field to learn. It is perfectly right and hundred percent right,” he told Accra-based Citi FM.

But the Ministry of Education says its initial investigations have revealed the infamous textbook “appears to be uncommissioned solo effort by the said author [Prof Quarm]” and has thus not gone through the requisite approval processes of the Ghana Education Service.

It noted there is only one GES-approved primary one science text book – Natural Science for Primary Schools: Activity-Based Pupils’ Book 1 – which states on page 62 that “our head contains the brain which helps us to think”.

“The Ministry wishes to advice against associating the Ministry or the Ghana Education Service to this publication”, it said.

Why the need for a targeted education policy in Ghana Why the need for a targeted education policy in Ghana

What history says

Though Ghana’s educational system follows the British model and is considered one of the best in West Africa, it is still far away from equal standards across the country and lacks high standards of quality. It is the “right” of every Ghanaian child to be educated regardless of their economic circumstances and so theEducational Reform Programme of 1987 to ensure that even the poor and vulnerable get access to formal education was introduced. In 2000, world leaders committed to ensure that, by 2015, children everywhere, boys and girls alike, would be able to complete a full course of primary schooling by giving them access to free education.

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